OUTLIVE CREATIVE FAQ

This page is a culmination of resources that we've found helpful to us as well as our clients. If you have any questions then it is most likely answered here.

 
 

VIDEO PRODUCTION FAQ

 

1. WHY YOU SHOULD SHARE YOUR BUDGET (TIPS)

Budgeting Tip # 1: A reference video is a great place to start.

The best way to get a quick estimate is to have a reference video to compare to. (I.e. “How much would something like ‘this’ cost.”)

Budgeting Tip # 2: Share your budget

Every business has a budget and yet most businesses are reluctant to share budget figures hoping they will get an amazing deal if they don’t disclose anything.  We’ve been on both sides (client and agency side) and we've always had better results when we said ‘Here’s our budget, here are our business objectives,  what can you do for us?” If you don’t declare a budget then the production company will have to guess at a budget. We recently lost a job because the budget we guessed at was too high – even though the client really liked the concept that we had proposed. (Does the company that guesses closest to your undeclared budget win?)

Budgeting Tip # 3: Be open minded.

Many businesses begin the video development process with; 1. A specific video type or style  in mind, 2. A prepared script and/or 3. Specific creative approach in mind.  That said, it’s still a good idea to listen to alternative approaches – presumably you are hiring a video production company because of their experience and expertise.

 

2. RAW FOOTAGE

Most importantly and probably one of the most frequent questions we get asked is, "Can we get the raw footage?". Simply put, yes you can, but for a fee. When hiring us to shoot your event, commercial, promo material, etc. etc. you are investing in our crew's time and the requested edited, final deliverables. Anything outside of that scope, such as the raw un-edited media and project files isn't included. 

The cost for the client to purchase the raw footage is 150% of the contract price. If a clients project is $10,000 then the rights to the raw footage comes out to an additional $15,000. This fee grants the client access to the raw footage and permission to use it at their discretion. 

Some of the reasons we don't include the raw are explained below (taken from these articles - Who Owns The Video I Had Made? + Who Owns The Raw Video Footage?):

 

THE COPYRIGHT

This is the big one. And it is mainly about protecting the rights of everyone involved. When you make a video the production company will be very clear on what the video is for and where it will be displayed. They will then make sure everything is cleared for this and sign the copyright over to you. More importantly they will cost it in to the quote. This will not include the raw footage. Therefore if you think you will want the raw footage mention it at the start of the process.

 

THE COST

Following on from the copyright reason handing over raw footage does have a cost implication. If you imagine that on some high-end cameras an hour of footage can be 765 GB. If on a project 10 hours of footage is filmed that would be 7,650 GB! Nearly 8 terabytes of data! The hard-drive cost alone would be into the hundreds of dollars. On top of this there is the time it would take to export all the data, it could run into 20+ hours of computer time.

 

THE LOSS OF FUTURE WORK

This is the first reaction for any production company when you ask for the raw footage. The client is going to take our work and get someone else to work on it for half the price! We are in a very paranoid industry!

Imagine being a chef and a customer comes to the kitchen and asks for all the ingredients and the secret recipe to your award-winning dish. That customer may only want to recreate the meal at home or they may take that recipe to the restaurant next door for another chef to make it at half the price.

In most cases the client motives are genuine and have an innocent reason behind them. But that doesn’t stop production companies sweating with fear at the thought of the implication. They also worry that someone else is going to ruin their work. It does seem crazy but most creative people have an attachment to their work no matter whom it is for. And the thought of someone blemishing that is hard.

 

SEEING US NAKED

This is the silliest reason but has to be mentioned. With every great shot amongst the raw footage, there may be several bad shots that would never make the edit. Those shots ruined by minor tech issues, poor timing, sudden shifts in lighting, or by that one ‘videobomber’ incapable of waving at the camera. A camera op may spend an hour trying to get the perfect shot. During this time, 59 minutes may be complete rubbish (with the odd swearword thrown in every time they mess up). These moments are not exactly a good reflection of their best work and something they won’t want many to see. But would all be totally worth it for that one great shot.

At the end of the day whatever the reason, if you have a contract first with all this agreed you wont have any problems. One final note, it’s worth mentioning that although the production company holds the raw footage it doesn’t mean they are free to do what they want with it and use it without first seeking your approval.

 

Below are some more great reads on this subject:

Cinema Law: Who Owns What? + Do You Own The Copyright When You Shoot A Video?

 

3. ONLY SEEKING CINEMATOGRAPHY SERVICES?

In a scenario where you only need us to shoot your project because you have an in-house editor then the following charges would apply: 

  • Rate for production crew
  • Cost of the raw footage rights (see #1 on this page for raw footage information)
  • Video editor's rate at $250/hour + cost of hard drive + postage. The standard procedure for this process is below:
    • Importing the footage from cameras
    • Transferring all files to your hard drive
    • Making a backup copy
    • Snail mailing the hard drive

 

4. PAYMENT STRUCTURE

  • Non-Refundable Deposit: 50% of the project cost due upon booking
  • 2nd Payment: 100% of the remaining balance is due 1 week before the shoot date

E-Check / ACH Bank Transfer (Preferred): Pay online with no additional fees. 

Paying online: For your convenience, we do have an option to pay online. This method would be an additional 3% to cover the merchant fee. 

Mail a check: We also accept checks.

 

5. TURNAROUND TIME

This depends on your deadline. Our standard time to deliver the first draft is 15 business days. If you need your final product delivered within a few days of the shoot a rush editing charge may be applied.

 

6. TRAVEL RATES

Gas Compensation - Billed at $1 per mile for any shoots outside a 30 mile radius of Portland

Travel Time Compensation - Billed at $30 per hour per person if the shoot is beyond a 30 mile radius of Portland

 

7. OUR PROCESS OUTLINED

  1. Your inquiry comes in and we connect to figure out your needs/wants
  2. A budget is established and we offer a proposal suited to your project including; pre-production logistics, production method, and post-production timeline
  3. We send over a quote outlining everything we discussed and what you'll be receiving
  4. You approve the quote and we send you a contract that you can sign electronically
  5. A 50% non-refundable deposit is collected to lock in your shoot date in our calendar
  6. Pre-production and logistics begin leading up to the shoot date
  7. We setup a pre-shoot meeting to make sure our teams are all on the same page
  8. 100% of the remaining balance is due 1 week before the shoot
  9. Shoot day executed 
  10. We import and make a backup copy of the footage
  11. First cut is delivered based on your schedule. This cut is rough and not color corrected. You give us feedback and let us know what isn't vibing with you
  12. Our editors make revisions and the second cut is delivered within 2-5 days. This cut will begin to look polished and we start color correcting the film. You give us feedback and let us know what isn't vibing with you
  13. We purchase the music license, cater to your revisions, complete color correction, and button up the film. The final cut is delivered via digital download in the format that you requested
  14. Project wrap

 

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PHOTOGRAPHY FAQ

 

1. WHY YOU SHOULD SHARE YOUR BUDGET (TIPS)

Budgeting Tip # 1: A reference gallery is a great place to start.

The best way to get a quick estimate is to have a reference gallery to compare to. (I.e. “How much would something like ‘this’ cost.”)

Budgeting Tip # 2: Share your budget

Every business has a budget and yet most businesses are reluctant to share budget figures hoping they will get an amazing deal if they don’t disclose anything.  We’ve been on both sides (client and agency side) and we've always had better results when we said ‘Here’s our budget, here are our business objectives,  what can you do for us?” If you don’t declare a budget then the production company will have to guess at a budget. We recently lost a job because the budget we guessed at was too high – even though the client really liked the concept that we had proposed. (Does the company that guesses closest to your undeclared budget win?)

Budgeting Tip # 3: Be open minded.

Many businesses begin the video development process with; 1. A specific video type or style  in mind, 2. A prepared script and/or 3. Specific creative approach in mind.  That said, it’s still a good idea to listen to alternative approaches – presumably you are hiring a video production company because of their experience and expertise.

 

2. CATEGORIES OF PHOTOGRAPHY USE

The business of professional photography is broken into three main categories of use. Commercial refers to photography that is used to sell or promote a product, service, or idea. Editorial refers to photography used for educational or journalistic purposes. Retail refers to photography commissioned or purchased for personal use.

The difference between these categories is not in the type of photography, but in the use of the images. For example, suppose that a corporation hires a photographer to document a product launch event. For the corporation, the type of photography being commissioned is event coverage, and the use is commercial because the corporation will use the photographs to promote their new product. For a local newspaper covering the same product launch, the use would be editorial.

An example of retail photography would be a wedding, which is also event coverage — but now the work is categorized as retail because the end use is personal.

Commercial, editorial or retail, photographs are intellectual property. Unless you are an employee or have contractually transferred ownership, you become the owner of this property when you create the image. Licensing this property for specific uses is how your business generates gross income.

 

3. IMAGE USAGE RIGHTS AND LICENSING FEES

A license is a contract in which the photographer grants specific rights to the client who wants to use the image. The client can only use the image within the scope of the agreement. There are many variables when pricing lmage licensing fees. Some questions to keep in mind that will help us
determine the cost of your license are:

  1. Media Permissions. An accurate description of the media in/on which the client will use the image, and the extent to which the client may use the image in that media. Example 1: Surfers Journal Magazine Advertisement.

  2. Distribution Format. The format in which the specified media may be distributed. Example 1: Printed. Example 2: Electronic Download.

  3. Placement. The locations/positions at which the image may appear in/on the specified media, and the maximum number of placements permitted in each instance of that media. Example 1: Single placement on the front cover. Example 2: Multiple placements on cover and interior.

  4. Size. The “image size” — the maximum size at which the image may be reproduced in/on the specified media Example 1: up to one-half page.
    Example 2: up to 8.5 x 5.5 inches.

  5. Versions. The maximum number of design versions, editions or issues in/on which the image may be reproduced. Example: First edition only.

  6. Quantity. The maximum number of reproductions of the image that may be distributed or displayed in the specified media. Example 1: 10,000 Brochures. For magazine or newspaper advertising. Example 2: Total circulation of 850,000.

  7. Duration. The scope of the time period during which the client may exercise the license. Example: Six months.

  8. Region. The geographic locations in/to which your image may be distributed or displayed in/on the specified media. Example: Oregon only.

  9. Language. The language/s of text that may be reproduced in the specified media in/on which the photograph is reproduced. Example: English only.

  10. Exclusivity.The exclusivity provided. Example: Non-exclusive.

  11. License Start Date. The date on which the license commences. This is different than the Duration.

  12. License End Date. The date on which granted rights expire. The license start date plus the duration equals the license end date

  13. Media Constraints. Region Constraints, Product/Service Constraints, if applicable: Specific limitations on or exceptions to the licensed media. Media example 1: Snowboarder Magazine only. Media Example 2: Only at the following URL: www.hippytree.com.com/specialoffer Region Example: Only in South Pasadena. Product/Service example: Only for Volcom Clothing.

  14. Image Information. One of the most critical elements of any license description is the description of the image or images that are associated with the license. The license description should precisely define or identify the quantity of images that may be used under the license.

More info on image rights and licensing through the links below:

DIY Photography + FStoppers + ASMP

4. PAYMENT STRUCTURE

  • Non-Refundable Deposit: 50% of the project cost due upon booking
  • 2nd Payment: 100% of the remaining balance is due 1 week before the shoot date

Paying online: For your convenience, we do have an option to pay online. This method would be an additional 3% to cover the merchant fee. 

Mail a check: This is the best method to avoid the fee.

 

5. TURNAROUND TIME

This depends on your deadline. Our standard time to deliver is up to 30 days. If you need your final product delivered within a few days of the shoot a rush editing charge may be applied. 

 

6. TRAVEL RATES

Gas Compensation - Billed at $1 per mile for any shoots outside a 30 mile radius of Portland

Travel Time Compensation - Billed at $30 per hour per person if the shoot is beyond a 30 mile radius of Portland

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